Browsing the archives for the CITES tag

‘CITES and the Rhino Horn Trade’ [Slideshow]

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This informative 30-page slideshow presentation points out that the solutions to the rhino crisis can be found in increased protection in all implicated states through international and national legislation, improved enforcement, stiffer penalties, and demand reduction – not legalized trade.

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Mixed Outcome for Rhino Horn Trade Issues at CITES Meeting

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The 61st meeting of Standing Committee of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) netted mixed reactions regarding efforts to address the surge in illicit rhino horn trafficking.

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London Calling: Rhino Horn Consumer Countries Need to ‘Educate’ Citizens

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Britain plans to address CITES this week with the request that rhino horn consumer countries launch awareness campaigns to debunk the notion that rhino horn contains medicinal properties.

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CITES: Zimbabwe Will Not Sell Rhino Horn Stockpiles

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Zimbabwe’s disconcerting plan to fuel the rhino horn market is derailed. A risky move by Zimbabwe to sell its five tonnes of stockpiled rhino horn has reportedly been thwarted by CITES. The notion was quashed before it could be turned into a formal proposal, and the country’s bid to release rhino horn into the illegal […]

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Following New Trade Ban Announcement, Antique Rhino Horn Trophy Stolen from UK Auction House

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Thieves have targeted an Essex auction house for its mounted rhino horn trophy. Just days after the UK instituted a total ban on the sale of antique rhino horn trophies, Sworder’s Auctioneers became the scene of the latest rhino-related crime: The theft of a mounted black rhino head. The sale of antique rhino horn trophies […]

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Effective Immediately: Illegal to Trade Rhino Horn Trophies in UK

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Rhino horn trophies can no longer be traded in the UK. The European Commission has taken additional steps to crack down on abuse of legal trade loopholes: Effective immediately, it is now illegal to sell antique rhino horn trophies and mounted rhino horns in the UK. Authorities became suspicious after a surge of buyers from […]

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EU Plans to Ban Sales of Antique Rhino Trophies to Stop Abuse of Trade Loopholes

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Regulations tighten further around antique rhino horn sales. In an increased effort to stop exploitation of legal trade loopholes, the European Commission is planning a major crackdown on sales of antique rhino horn. A surge of buyers from the Far East paying unprecedented prices for mounted rhino horn has raised concerns that these items are […]

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Critically Endangered Black Rhino Slaughtered in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

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Demand for traditional Chinese medicine strikes the world-famous Serengeti. Despite being microchipped and under “elite” guard, a critically endangered black rhino has been butchered in Tanzania’s famed Serengeti National Park. The rhino was reportedly found – with the horns hacked off – on Tuesday. Rhishja Cota-LarsonI am the founder of Annamiticus, an educational nonprofit organization […]

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Antique Rhino Horn Could Contain Arsenic

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Antique rhino horn leaking into the illegal market could be hazardous to the consumer. Thanks to the surging demand for illegal rhino horn, even the taxidermy industry has been infiltrated. However, there could be an unpleasant surprise for the eventual end user of rhino horn acquired from antique hunting trophies. Rhishja Cota-LarsonI am the founder […]

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Chinese Researchers Hope to Turn Rhino Horn Cultivation into Thriving Enterprise While Avoiding CITES Scrutiny

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A state-funded 2008 rhino horn research proposal from China has raised some serious questions surrounding the escalation in demand for rhino horn. There are concerns that the project’s timing served as one of the catalysts for the surge in rhino killings across Southern Africa by encouraging the use of rhino horn, and that the researchers are attempting to circumvent CITES research provisions by farming rhinos.

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